Amerika: Germany Over All

killing libertyThese days I don’t know what to think. Everywhere I turn things are bad. Males and females have lost even their most profound identification — sexuality — under the barrage of propaganda from the creative freaks who dominate America. Our children are being wrested from our control while we blithely continue our day-to-day lives. We can’t seem to wake up. It’s a nightmare you can’t escape.

I’ve been searching the signs and portents everywhere and I can’t find anything to cheer about. The one issue, out of so many, that caught my greatest interest is the news that the US Supreme Court is considering whether to take on the case of the Romeike family who fled Germany to escape draconian State laws prohibiting home schooling. In the past and for Americans, the Romeike plight would have been merely a footnote in the annals of history, just another case of how twisted a value system the EU propagates. Unfortunately, it becomes not a footnote but a whole story unto itself when we consider that the only reason the Romeikes are still in the news is that the inaptly named US Department of Justice has decided they agree with the EU on home schooling. At least that is how I am interpreting the regime’s prosecutorial zeal in suing to overturn a lower court decision granting this family asylum on grounds of persecution and certainty of prosecution if returned to their home country.

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Here is a recap of the battle so far: the Romeikes Sr. object to the social content of German education in public schools, inasmuch as portions of what is being taught or even propagated (i.e. homosexuality) go against their religious beliefs. They have given their children an excellent education in other mandated (scholastic) areas and the kids test very well. But here’s the problem: it seems that a Nazi law enacted in the 1930s to ensure the State absolute control of the minds of Germany’s youth prohibits home schooling. There was nothing more dangerous to the Nazis than some dissenting parent passing on ideas pernicious to the Third Reich. Unlike the Hitlerian dictates on racial purification, after the war the Nazi system of state thought control was left in place. First the post-war Germans used the law to eradicate from the young all Nazi sentiments and thoughts and then they used the public school system to indoctrinate children in socialist and progressivist philosophy. By forcing everybody into the same heavily policed political correctness, the State can avoid disruptive dissent. I can’t figure out what the difference is between those war-time Germans who pounded Nazi thoughts and values into the children’s heads and today’s modernists. It seems as if both generations supported the idea that the State must not merely educate, but indoctrinate.

Under the German law, parents who refuse to send their kids to public school can be fined, prosecuted and imprisoned, and they can lose custody of their kids, too. This is not a scare story. In December 2013, a German judge allowed a home-schooling couple’s children to be released from State custody with a warning to put them in a public school and not try fleeing to a country where home education is allowed. If they violated his orders, he vowed to chase them down and prosecute. Good old Germany. It may be enforcing a whole set of perverted values, but it is doing it to the full extent of the law. As the French say, the more things change, the more they remain the same.

After the Romeikes showed up in the US as visitors, they claimed asylum on grounds of persecution. And the original court of hearing agreed and granted asylum. Here is where our own Neo-Totalitarians come in. Eric Holder’s Justice Department decided perhaps for the first time ever in US history to sue to overturn the granting of asylum. The USG is using our tax dollars to fund a campaign of persecution against Christians who refuse to allow the brainwashing of their children into an alien ideology. The Justice Department says it agrees with the EU and that all the German officials were doing was following orders. Or maybe they said, “following the law.”  It doesn’t matter — it was the same excuse Nazis used to dodge responsibility for the death-camps, or sheriffs used in the US to persecute people for the color of their skin. Just because a law exists doesn’t mean it is just. Ask Eric Holder, who used force to take over a university building because of “political” objections to that administration. He didn’t care much for US law then, and between you and me, he doesn’t today, either.

Immigration (ICE) most recently has argued that the U.S. government, too, has the authority to simply prohibit homeschooling, and that this fact should disqualify the granting of asylum to the Romeikes.  ICE further noted that Judge Burman “did not address how under various state laws of the United States a person can be similarly prosecuted for not sending one’s children to school.” This is, of course, a red herring. A parent can be punished for not providing an education to his or her children, or not providing one that meets state academic standards, but not because they don’t go to a public school. And they cannot be prosecuted for teaching moral principles in line with their faith. That is the real issue in the Romeike case.

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This is a case of violation of freedom of conscience as well as freedom of religion in its broadest sense. The Romeikes came to America legally as visitors but actually were escaping the false choice offered them by German authorities: turn over your responsibility for your children’s lives and minds, give up your religious convictions, or face the legal consequences. The authorities were not satisfied that the Romeike children were in fact being educated, in accordance with a 1918 law making education mandatory. They relied instead on that much more convenient Nazi law. The difference between the two laws in question is that one encourages education and the other encourages State indoctrination. In resisting State indoctrination, the churning out of that one-mind mass that makes it easy for the State to rule, the Romeikes took on the foundations of modern European society. In today’s Europe, the one thing that is unforgivable is non-conformity. The State rules, the State forms the ideas, and the State makes all the choices. Sounds a lot like old Europe, doesn’t it, only the parameters by which one is judged have been turned on their head. Ambassador Thomas Schirrmacher, Director of the International Institute for Religious Freedom, points out that  [N]early a dozen major human rights documents and treaties, including the 1948 Universal Declaration on Human Rights, recognize how important the role of parental decision-making is in the education of children and that free governments must recognize and respect this important right. As Ambassador Schirrmacher points out, the actions of the EU violate that premise. But that isn’t a problem for modern government. In the EU, they celebrate territorial integrity and the right to self-determination side by side, but in reality they only support the right to self-determination. Same when it comes to parental rights — they stop where the State says “Stop,” which could be at the cradle or even in utero. Contradictions are not a problem in modern government; all you have to do is ignore them.

I don’t really care what they do in Europe. I care what happens here. Do we really have to create an underground society to live in freedom — or is there any hope left in this country that was once a beacon to freedom? I think there are many millions of Americans even now pondering what lies ahead and what our choices might be. But one thing is certain: as goes freedom of religion, so go all the freedoms our Constitution recognizes. We are either going to give them away under threat or in exchange for false freedoms, like the freedom of total sexual hedonism, or we are going to keep them, no matter what.

I know where I stand.

Visit author Norma Brown, a former diplomat, at her blog Ooobie on Everything.

Linked at Tulsa Social Media, with lots of news, read it here.

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