The Afternoon Sky Will Darken

The West Coast of the United States (and a good part of the Pacific Ocean) should get ready for one of the wildest journeys they can experience.

This comes right off the Super Moon Event of earlier this month.  This spectacular event will out do even that Magnificent Spectacle.

From SpaceWeather:

On Sunday, May 20th, the Moon will pass in front of the Sun, producing an annular solar eclipse visible across the Pacific side of Earth. The path of annularity, where the sun will appear to be a “ring of fire” stretches from China and Japan to the middle of North America:

SOLAR ECLIPSE THIS WEEKEND: On Sunday, May 20th, the Moon will pass in front of the Sun, producing an annular solar eclipse visible across the Pacific side of Earth. The path of annularity, where the sun will appear to be a “ring of fire” stretches from China and Japan to the middle of North America

An animated eclipse map prepared by Larry Koehn of ShadowandSubstance.com shows the best times to look. In the United States, the eclipse begins at 5:30 pm PDT and last for two hours. Maximum coverage is around 6:30 pm PDT.

Because this is not a total eclipse, some portion of the sun will always be exposed. To prevent eye damage, use eclipse glasses, a safely-filtered telescope, or a solar projector to observe the eclipse. You can make a handy solar projector by criss-crossing your fingers waffle-style. Rays of light beaming through the gaps will have the same shape as the eclipsed sun. Or look on the ground beneath leafy trees for crescent-shaped sunbeams and rings of light

Full Story

Remember to never look directly into an eclipse.  Magnified sunlight can cause serious eye damage even during an eclipse.

 

And Enjoy The Show!!!!

One Pingback/Trackback

  • Pingback: Maggie’s Notebook | Grumpy Opinions()

  • Bunkerville

    Sounds like the universe will give us a good show.

  • You can also make the equivalent of a pinhole camera. Take a piece of cardboard and make a pin hole in it. Hold this card above a plain sheet of paper and vary the distance between the two until you get a nice sharp circular image. You can then watch the eclipse reflected on the paper.

    • John

      Thanks for the suggestion. I’ll follow that

      • We really followed up but we haven’t experienced here in our place. It’s a bit cloudy..

  • Nolan

    Eagerly waiting for ‘Ring of Fire’ hope it’ll be a great one!